Sunday, November 11, 2001
M o n d a y ,  N o v e m b e r  1 2,  2 0 0 1
Tuesday, November 13, 2001

Kabul Falls to Northern Alliance


Jubilant Northern Alliance Fighters
Near Bagram, 11/12/01

Excerpts from articles describing the latest advances in the Northern Alliance and U.S. military moves to drive the Taleban out of power:

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Taleban forces have abandoned Kabul, fleeing south overnight as contingents of Northern Alliance troops entered the city amid scenes of jubilation.

The BBC's John Simpson, who arrived in the Afghan capital on foot ahead of the Northern Alliance, says huge crowds gathered in some areas of the city shouting "death to Pakistan" and "death to the Taleban".

As looting broke out in the city some Arab volunteers serving with the Taleban were summarily shot and a BBC camera crew was attacked.

Another BBC correspondent, William Reeve, says columns of Taleban troops were seen fleeing towards their southern stronghold, Kandahar, as small groups of Northern Alliance troops entered Kabul. ...

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Analysis: The Taleban Collapse

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It took the Taleban nearly four years to capture much of northern Afghanistan and the capital Kabul - between 1994 and 1998.

It has taken just a few days for the Islamist militia to abandon its hard-fought gains. ...


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Early Indications are that Flight 587 Crash an Accident

Excerpts from article describing the investigation into the tragic crash of Flight 587 in New York:

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Investigators say preliminary evidence points to mechanical failure rather than terrorism as the cause of Monday's air crash in New York.

Emergency workers in New York have so far recovered 265 bodies from where the American Airlines jet crashed, near the city's John F Kennedy airport. Up to nine people were still missing on the ground. ...

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Gore Counted Out of White House Too Early, Study Finds

Excerpts from article describing the investigation into the way in which the U.S. Presidential election was decided:

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George Bush would probably have still won Florida and the presidency last year if either of two limited recounts - one requested by Al Gore, the other ordered by the Florida Supreme Court - had been completed, according to a study commissioned by a media consortium.

But if Mr Gore had found a way to trigger a statewide recount of all disputed ballots, or if the courts had required it, the result would have probably been different. An examination of uncounted ballot papers found enough of them clearly intended for Mr Gore to have given him a win.

The study showed that if the two limited recounts had not been short-circuited, Mr Bush would have held his lead over Mr Gore, with margins ranging from 225 to 493. But the study also found that whether dimples are counted or a more restrictive standard is used, a statewide tally favoured Mr Gore by 60 to 171 votes.

Mr Gore's narrow margin in the statewide count was the result of a windfall in over-votes - papers on which a voter may have marked a candidate's name and also written it in. These were rejected by machines as a double vote and most would not have been included in the limited recounts.

The study by media groups, an unprece-dented effort that involved examining 175,010 ballots in 67 counties, underscores what began to be apparent as soon as the polls closed in the nation's third most populous state - that no-one can say with certainty who won Florida.

Under every scenario used in the study, the winning margin remains fewer than 500 votes out of almost 6 million cast. ...

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