Syllables - Comparison of old diabetes terms / new terms
October 9, 2015

This article addresses yet another valuable advantage of using the new terms for the old diabetes / diabetic words, new terms that I first proposed in 2010.

That advantage? Fewer syllables with no usage of the old confusing / misleading diabetes and diabetic terms.

Old terms which use the old diabetes word, the number of syllables each of them contains, the new terms that I  first proposed in 2010, & the number of syllables each of them contains:

 
    Old Terms ........... Syllables


    New Terms ........... Syllables


  1. diabetes ................ 4

  2. diabetes mellitus ....... 7

  3. diabetes insipidus ...... 8

  4. type 1 diabetes ......... 6
  5. latent autoimmune
    diabetes in adults ..... 13


  6. prediabetes ............. 5
  7. type 2 diabetes ......... 6
  8. gestational diabetes .... 8

  9. maturity onset diabetes
    of the young ........... 13
  10. neonatal diabetes ....... 8

  11. other diabetes mellitus . 9

  1. ......................... 0

  2. High Glucose Conditions . 6

  3. Insipidus ............... 4

  4. Insulinitis ............. 5
  5. Latent Autoimmune
    Insulinitis ............ 11


  6. PreCellosis ............. 4
  7. Cellosis ................ 3
  8. Gestational Cellosis .... 7


  9. Diminosis ............... 4
  10. Neonatal Diminosis ...... 8

  11. Other High Glucose
    Conditions .............. 8


As you can see, part of the reason folks are tempted to (and often do) use the old diabetes word instead of the old entire name for the exact condition is that the number of syllables for the full names are so large.

What about the new names?

As you can see above, the old diabetes word is eliminated (the old diabetes word confusingly combines a non-glucose anomaly with High Glucose Conditions), all but one of the new words has fewer syllables than the old diabetes phrases with one having the same syllables (but with a much improved name, Neonatal Diminosis), and all of the new terms are freed of the old diabetes word confusion / misleading burdens and are
  • clear,

  • distinct,

  • non-confusing,

  • non-misleading,

  • accurate,

    and

  • vastly superior to the old diabetes / diabetic terms




Diabetic? Replaced by the phrase "someone  with _____ (insert exact condition name here)", and in all conditions which use diabetic in their description (such as diabetic retinopathy), simply replace that diabetic word with the exact condition someone has (for example, if someone has retinopathy caused by Insulinitis, the new name for that condition would be Insulinitis Retinopathy).




Further syllable reduction? Well, I'm tempted to use the abbreviations for the new names to further the reduction in syllables (for a complete list of the abbreviations, see the graphic at the end of this article), but have yet to decide if the advantages of doing so outweigh the disadvantages. For example, Islit, the 2 syllable abbreviation for Insulinitis, the advantages of its shortness / brevity, would that be outweighed by the absence of the meaningfully important "itis" suffix, and the meaningfully important "insulin" word, which everyone with Islit depends on for our survival?

Of course, in all posts using the Islit word, I'd simply mention the fact that that's an abbreviation for Insulinitis at the beginning of the article (similar to the way some articles mention that they've replaced type 1 diabetes references with the abbreviation T1D).




For complete details supporting changing the old diabetes / diabetic / reactive hypoglycemia names, see Diabetes Bubble / Diabetes Bubble Burst, a superb and unique compilation of a vast amount of invaluable revelations about each of the Glucose Anomalies and one non-glucose anomaly (Insipidus), and refer to the following Old Names / New Improved Names graphic for a handy guide to the proposed terms and abbreviations to replace the old diabetes / diabetic / reactive hypoglycemia vernacular: