Christians Miraculously Saved
in Tsunami?
(Top Posts - Social/Legal - 021605)

Naturalists tend to accept that in a naturalistic world,
we're subject to the risks inherent in living in a very
dangerous environment.

To the extent we can prevent calamities, and avoid
danger, naturalists tend to try to do so. To the extent
we cannot, naturalists accept that in a naturalistic
realm, people living along the coastal regions in an
area which experienced one of the worst earthquakes
in recorded history (recently, assessed as a 9.3 on
the Richter scale) could only have been helped by
education -and- a warning system.

In one instance, a British girl educated on tsunami
risks warned her family and an entire hotel, and those
folks narrowly escaped just in time.

If there is no god, everything that happened during
the recent horrific tragedy is explainable by the facts
regarding our naturalistic existence in a naturalistic
realm, including the following:

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Church Building and Its Members
Reported Swept to Sea
http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2005/101/13.0.html

Complete article:

Horrific and hopeful stories emerging from Sri Lankan
Christians.

By Paul Gallagher in Melbourne, Australia |
posted 01/03/2005 4:30 p.m.

Sri Lankan Christians fear that an entire church and its
congregation have been swept to sea in Sri Lanka by
tsunami waves December 26.

Lanka Bible College staff member Mihirukshi Perera
said the school received the as-yet-unconfirmed report
from the eastern city Mullaittivu, where a church building
has been located close to the sea.

"The church was conducting their morning Sunday
service," Perera said. "The tidal wave swept the pastor
and the entire congregation out to sea and the church
building has been destroyed completely."

No further details of the congregation or its fate have
yet emerged. One pastor in Mullaittivu lost nine mem-
bers of his family, Perera noted. Another from the
same city lost his wife and two children.

"Pastor Sathiyaraj from Trincomalee Assembly of
God [in eastern Sri Lanka] reports to us that in the
village of Kochchaveli and Muthur, the bodies are still
being recovered and the damage is extensive," Perera
said.

"Pastor Ravi Laurance, who serves in the east, has
lost his 12 year-old daughter," Perera added. "We
know of other pastors who have lost wives, mothers,
and sisters due to the tidal waves."

But not all the stories are tragic, relief workers
report.

"Pastor Gunasekaram [Zion church, in eastern Batti-
caloa] and his family have experienced God's mighty
protection during this time of tragedy," Perera said.
"They climbed a building for shelter to protect them-
selves from the waves and when the water receded
they climbed down. No sooner were they out of the
building than it collapsed. But their lives were saved."
However, they lost their house and belongings.

In another report, a pastor and his wife ministering in
the southwestern city of Galle were riding in a bus
when the tsunami first hit.

"A huge tidal wave heaved the bus up and it filled with
water," Perera said. "They had started praising God
and the other Christians in the bus had also joined
them in praising. At that moment the water had sub-
sided and they were able to get out and run for safety."

Believers of the Apostolic Church in the western city
of Moratuwa lost most of their belongings and houses,
Perera said. "Pastor Shehan, who serves in this church,
had gone in search of some children of his congregation.
At that moment he was caught by a tidal wave but was
able to save his life, miraculously. The children were
also found safe later."

Copyright 2005 Christianity Today.
Click for reprint information.

- - - end excerpt - - -

While mourning the close to 300,000 deaths, and wel-
coming any reports of survival, one would be wise to
pause and ponder the consequences of crediting an
all-powerful being for the survival of people of all
faiths and non-faith, and holding said all-powerful
being blameless (or to blame) for all the horror that
transpired.

Said practice comes across as capricious and aribitrary
human fantasy, simply making up stories about a sup-
posed God doing or not doing things, as if just by saying
it, that makes it so. That practice reminds doubters and
disbelievers of the severe limitations in placing blind
faith in religious leaders, religious documents, and
religious claims regarding what a supposed all-powerful
being is and is not.

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