Startling Revelation: Iraq Surge Myth Debunked
(Top Posts - Social/Legal - 100408)


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The following, mentioned that "highly clas-
sified operations" involving "newly devel-
oped techniques and operations" are respon-
sible for the drop in violence in Iraq.

I suspect that it has to be something to do
with a technological developement.

Being that it's classified, I'll just leave it at
that, as one can only wonder what that (or
those) technologies might be, but that, not
the surge, is what Bob Woodward credits,
all but refuting McCain's political bluster
that the surge caused the drop in violence.

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Last night, on 'Real Time With Bill Maher',
Bob Woodward made the following com-
ments.

Bill Maher: "... You're telling the world that
it's not just because of the increased troops,
it's because of what you call highly classified
techniques ... that we have targeted our ene-
mies over there, and somehow we get them ...
Why did they tell you?"

Bob Woodward: "... I have two years to work
on it, and you have to get people to level with
you, and people leveled with me and said 'Look,
it's not the surge, if you look at the numbers
and the very dramatic dropoff in violence, it's
so sudden, something had to happen, and it
turns out it's these highly classified operations
which the White House in a statement after the
book came out, did confirm and said there's
newly developed techniques and operations
and some day decades from day the story can
be told. But that's really what's lowered vio-
lence and brought about conditions in Iraq
that are much more stable."

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Why Did Violence Plummet?
It Wasn't Just the Surge.

By Bob Woodward
Washington Post Staff Writer

Monday, September 8, 2008; Page A09
   http://tinyurl.com/whyviolencedeclinediniraq

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Excerpts:

Beginning in the late spring of 2007, the U.S.
military and intelligence agencies launched
a series of top-secret operations that enabled
them to locate, target and kill key individuals
in groups such as al-Qaeda in Iraq, the Sunni
insurgency and renegade Shia militias, or so-
called special groups.

The operations incorporated some of the most
highly classified techniques and information
in the U.S. government.

...

A second important factor in the lessening of vio-
lence was the so-called Anbar Awakening, in which
tens of thousands of Sunnis turned against al-Qaeda
in Iraq and signed up with U.S. forces.

...

A third significant break came Aug. 29, when mili-
tant Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr ordered his power-
ful Mahdi Army to suspend operations, including
attacks against U.S. troops.

...

[On Thursday, a Washington Post news story on
"The War Within" reported the existence of the
covert operations and stated that it was the most
important of four factors in reducing the violence
in Iraq.]
  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/nation/specials/war-within/
...
[On Saturday, a Washington Post report by Joby
Warrick and Robin Wright provided a more de-
tailed look at U.S. counterinsurgency efforts in
Iraq. They reported that "fusion cells" of special
forces and intelligence officers, using spycraft
with sensors and cameras that can track targets,
have captured or killed hundreds of suspected
terrorists and their supporters in recent months.]
  http://tinyurl.com/hightechsolutiontoIraqcrisis

Excerpt from that article:

...

For the Joint Task Force, the CIA provides intelli-
gence analysts and spycraft with sensors and cam-
eras that can track targets, vehicles or equipment
for up to 14 hours. FBI forensic experts dissect
data, from cellphone information to the "pocket
litter" found on extremists. Treasury officials track
funds flowing among extremists and from govern-
ments.

National Security Agency staffers intercept con-
versations or computer data, and members of the
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency use high-
tech equipment to pinpoint where suspected ex-
tremists are using phones or computers.

Fusion cells remain one of the least-known aspects
of U.S. operations in Iraq, U.S. officials said, but
they have produced significant captures.

...

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Iraq war's total cost nearing Vietnam's price tag
Posted 7/25/2008 7:49 PM
  http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2008-07-25-1859942572_x.htm
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Excerpt:

...

Here are the report's estimated costs of major
wars, in 2008 dollars, and their costs as a per-
centage of GDP in each of their peak years: 

[re-sorted from most expensive to least expensive]

  1_World War II: $4.1 trillion; 35.8 percent
  2_Post 9/11 operations: $859 billion; 1.2 percent
  3_Vietnam War: $686 billion; 2.3 percent
  4_Iraq war: $648 billion; 1 percent
  5_Korean War: $320 billion; 4.2 percent
  6_World War I: $253 billion; 13.6 percent
  7_Afghanstian/Global war on terror: $171 billion; 0.3 percent
  8_Gulf War: $96 billion; 0.3 percent
  9_Civil War, Union: $45.2 billion; 11.3 percent
10_Post 9/11 domestic security: $33 billion; 0.1 percent
11_Civil War, Confederacy: $15.2 billion; GDP figure not available
12_American Revolution: $1.8 billion; GDP figure not available
13_War of 1812: $1.2 billion; 2.2 percent

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